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Heart Rhythm Institute

Posted on January 16th, 2017
Wander down the center aisle of any grocery store, and you’ll be amazed at the number of number of claims on the front of those boxes. Now with 50% less fat! Reduced sugar! Low sodium! Sometimes those claims can be helpful, but it’s important to understand the role the carbohydrates (which includes sugar), protein, fat, and sodium play in overall nutrition.  Carbohydrates Most... Read More
Posted on January 3rd, 2017
As the calendar turns to a new year, many people reflect on the past year and set goals or resolutions for the coming year. Weight loss is a common theme this time of year, as people resolve to improve their eating habits and get more exercise.  The Oklahoma Heart Hospital has a team of nutritionists on staff to help patients make the dietary changes necessary for both weight loss and heart... Read More
Posted on December 5th, 2016
In November, physicians at the Heart Rhythm Institute at the Oklahoma Heart Hospital became the first in the state of Oklahoma to use His-bundle pacing (HBP).  His-bundle pacing uses the same pacemaker as in a typical pacemaker placement, but utilizes a specialized screw-in lead placed in the His bundle rather than in the right ventricle. The His bundle is a bundle of cardiac fibers... Read More
Posted on November 16th, 2016
Most people are aware that being overweight increases the risk for health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and more. But what exactly is happening in the body that increases that risk? And what steps can you take to reduce your overall risk?   The percentage of adults in America who are overweight or obese has continued to rise in recent years with... Read More
Posted on November 6th, 2016
Obesity rates in the United States continue to increase with about 35% of adults now classified as obese according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Obesity increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. Obesity also increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heart rhythm. While AFib on its own is not generally a life... Read More
Posted on October 15th, 2016
Atrial fibrillation or AFib is a specific type of arrhythmia that occurs in the top chambers of the heart. Symptoms may include heart palpitations, shortness of breath, fatigue, light headedness, dizziness, and sometimes passing out. AFib on its own is not generally life threatening, but patients with AFib do have a higher risk of stroke than the average population. When assessing a patient... Read More
Posted on October 4th, 2016
Individuals with atrial fibrillation, a type of arrhythmia that occurs in the top chambers of the heart, have a higher risk of stroke than the average population. While AFib on its own is not generally life threatening and can be treated through medication or ablation, most AFib patients will be prescribed a blood thinner to reduce the risk of stroke. There are several options for blood thinners... Read More
Posted on September 15th, 2016
Premature ventricular contractions are extra beats that occur in the lower chambers of the heart, or ventricles. Patients often describe them as feeling like a very hard heartbeat followed by a missed beat, or like a fluttering or pounding in their chest. While not typically life-threatening on their own, frequent premature ventricular contractions can affect the heart’s overall function if... Read More
Posted on September 8th, 2016
Premature ventricular contractions, or PVCs, are a type of heart palpitation where extra beats originate in the bottom chambers of the heart, or ventricles. Single extra beats are called premature ventricular contractions. When multiple extra beats happen together, it becomes non-sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular tachycardia. Many patients describe their PVCs as feeling a really... Read More
Posted on August 15th, 2016
Norma first visited the Oklahoma Heart Hospital in 2010. She had been traveling and not feeling very well, so she made an appointment with her primary care physician when she returned home. Her primary care physician diagnosed her with atrial fibrillation and referred her to an Oklahoma Heart Hospital physician immediately. She began taking medications for AFib and also had a mitral valve... Read More

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